Legal Services Can Help Law Firms Research Specific Topics and Legal Precedents

Written by Law School on . Posted in Legislative counsel, Legislative intent service, Revenue and taxation code

State rules

So.
Much.
Information.
The amount of information that is available to Americans on any given day is overwhelming. The 24/7 nature of today’s news sources and the digitization of hundreds of years of past text and images creates a nearly never ending source of information. And while many Americans can peruse this information at their leisure, some professions rely on staying up to dat and instantly being able to access this information.
Of all the occupations that rely on past information for being successful, lawyers may be at the top of the list. Even though lawyers do not need to search the daily news that fills news feeds, they do need to reference the past legislative research as well as regulations and administrative code sections. And while much of this research has historically been left to the first year law students who think nothing of staying up all night and on weekends, the search of legislative history is becoming overwhelming.
Fortunately, the digitization of information can make some of this legislative history research more manageable. For United States code legislative history, for example, computer searches can be categorized by topic, by date, and by state.A “Legislative History Nevada,” search, for instance, can provide a different list of state statutes.
In 2012, 1,268,011 American men and women were practicing as licensed lawyers. And while this may seem like a big number, when the number of lawyers is put up against the massive amount of legal precedents to consult, the number in the profession does not seem so large.
As a result, many law firms now rely on more than just the first year law students and lawyers working their way up in the firm to generate the legal state statutes that they need. Contracting with services, for example, to help whenever a firm needs clarity and interpretation. These services are especially helpful on federal and state statutes and regulations. Asking for a search on “Legislative History Nevada,” for example, can enable a firm to more easily understand existing law. These specific searches can also provide details about the cause or circumstances leading to its enactment or amendment.
Finding a service with a large private collection of legislative American history materials provides an outside research staff that understands how to track down legislative and administrative documents generated from recent cases all of the way back to the 1700s. For more than 100 years, state courts have looked to evidence of legislative intent in writing and presenting state law. Whether a firm is looking for “Legislative History Nevada” or “Legislative History California,”
contracted services can help make those searches more productive and efficient.

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